Museums in Context and Partnership: April 19th-20th, National Railway Museum, York.

We’re hosting a conference in collaboration with the rather wonderful National Railway Museum in York.

In this two-day conference, we will be discussing the role of heritage institutions in our cities and communities, and how museums, galleries and higher education might work together for teaching, research and public engagement purposes. We will be drawing upon expertise from both the culture and heritage industry and from academic practitioners, and the conference will serve as a space for discussion of both the benefits and challenges of such initiatives, as well as an ideas exchange on best practice.

This conference is free to attend.  Register for your free place here.

PROGRAMME

19th April: Day 1 – Museums, Cities and Communities 

8.45am – 9am: Registration & coffee

9.00am – 9.10am: Welcome and introduction – Professor Dawn Hadley (Acting Vice President for Arts and Humanities, University of Sheffield)

9.10am – 10.40am: Museums and galleries in urban contexts: case studies

Laura Sillars (Artistic Director at Site Gallery, Sheffield)

Helen Featherstone (Director of the Sheffield Industrial Museums Trust & Kelham Island Museum, Sheffield)

Nicola Freeman (Director of Engagement & Learning at The Hepworth, Wakefield)

Anna Stolyarova (Director of the Amsterdam Street Art Museum, Amsterdam)

10.40am – 11am: Museum and gallery case studies: discussion and questions

11.00am: Coffee

11.10am – 12.10pm: Professor Dawn Hadley (University of Sheffield) & Nick Bax (Human)

‘Castlegate, Sheffield: heritage-led urban regeneration’

12.10pm: Lunch

1.15pm – 2.35pm: Panel 1

Adrian Steel (The Postal Museum)

‘Delivered: The Postal Museum’s new home in the heart of Clerkenwell’

Geoff Ginn (University of Queensland, Australia)

‘Heritage and Renewal: The North Ipswich Railway Workshops, the Queensland Museum and the challenge of ‘catalyst’ investment’

Gabor Stark (University for the Creative Arts)

‘EKR – The Friendly Army: Collective Remembrance and Collaborative Placemaking’

2.35pm – 4.00pm: Panel 2

Andrew Parkin / Sally Waite (Tyne & Wear Archives / Newcastle University)

‘Building a Community Curriculum: the Shefton Collection as a resource for schools’

Cynthia Johnston (School of Advanced Study, University of London),

‘A Pioneering Partnership: Blackburn Museum and the University of London; connecting cultures of research and management’

Kazz Morohashi (Norwich University of the Arts)

‘What did the dog see? Engaging with family audience through live listening and Go Walkeez’

Sue Perks (University for the Creative Arts)

‘The Importance of exhibition projects involving community engagement: my work with Aik Saath’

4.00pm: Coffee

4.15pm – 5.00pm: Andrew McLean (Assistant Director & Head Curator, NRM York)

‘Permanent displays as nexus of collaboration’

5.30 pm: Close

20th April: Day 2 – Museums, Galleries and Higher Education 

8.45am-9.15am: Registration & coffee

9.15am – 10.40am: Panel 1

Judith King (Arts & Heritage)

‘Meeting Point: Museums and contemporary artists working together’

Michael Eades (School of Advanced Study, University of London; Festival Curator and Manager, Being Human)

‘Plugging a Gap? ‘Being Human’ and a national perspective on university/museum partnerships’

Sarah Geere & Chris Baker (University of Sheffield)

‘The changing landscape of impact, knowledge exchange and partnership working’

10.40am – 12.00pm: Panel 2

Mike Esbester / Peter Thorpe (University of Portsmouth / NRM)

‘Crowdsourcing, collaboration, archives & accidents: the ‘Railway Work, Life & Death’ project’

Jonathan Aylen & Bob Gwynne (University of Manchester / NRM)

‘From Steam to E-Mail: how computers shaped the railways and railways shaped computing’

Barbara Warnock / Christine Schmidt (Wiener Library, London)

‘Collaborating with academia – the experiences of a small museum’

12pm: Lunch

1.00pm – 2.20pm: Panel 3

Linda Thomson (University College London)

‘Museums on Prescription: museums-based social prescribing scheme for lonely older adults’

Helena Chance / Hannah Ellams (Buckinghamshire New University / Wycombe Museum)

‘“Living, Laughing and Learning in High Wycombe Furniture Town”: a Wycombe Museum and Buckinghamshire New University Partnership’

Rachel Pattinson (Newcastle University)

‘From Warhorse to the Wombles: Seven Stories and Newcastle University’

2.20pm – 4.00pm: Panel 4

Sophie Vohra (University of York, NRM)

‘The Academic and the Museum: The Benefits and Difficulties of a Collaborative Doctoral Award’

Lauren Stokeld (University of York, NRM)

‘Learning the Ropes: Research Students in Public Engagement and a Question of Expertise’

Sarah Morton (University of Bath)

‘The grass isn’t always greener: Towards good practice guidelines for student projects and placements in the heritage sector’

Simona Valeriani (Victoria and Albert Museum, Royal College of Art)

‘Between Museum and Academia: Combining Research and Postgraduate Teaching at the V&A’

4.00pm: Coffee

4.15pm – 5.15pm: Professor Julian Richards (Director of WRoCAH, University of York)

‘Opportunities and Challenges of Partnership Working’

5.15pm – 6.30pm: Route 57 & Railway Cultures – Publications launch & drinks reception

Dan Eltringham (University of Sheffield)

‘Editing the Loco-Motion: Creative Writing, Print and the Museum’

Readings from contributors to Route 57

Islands, camps, zones: towards a nissological reading of Georges Perec

Screen Shot 2018-03-17 at 15.35.28

I’m currently writing a chapter for a book on Perec (which will be published in 2019) that presents a nissological reading of Perec’s work.

Nissology, a term coined by Grant McCall in 1996, derives from the Greek nisos (island) and describes the interdisciplinary theory of islands and islandness. My chapter takes as its starting point three case studies from the Perecquian corpus: the imaginary island of W (which appears in W, ou le souvenir d’enfance, the semi-autobiographical text that was first published in 1975) and which functions as an allegory of the Nazi concentration camps; Ellis Island (the US migrant inspection centre that is the subject of Perec and Robert Bober’s 1980 film, Récits d’Ellis Island); and the Parisian îlots insalubres (usually translated as ‘unhealthy zones’, but more literally, small islands – or islets – of insalubrity) that dominated French planning discourse from the late nineteenth century right through the 4th Republic (there is still mention of ‘tubercular islands’ in planning documents dated 1956), and in one of which la rue Vilin (where Perec was born and which features in L’Infra-ordinaire, W and the unfinished Lieux project) was situated. The main thrust of the argument is that around these major islands, and through a series of textual and historical allusions, Perec constellates a broader carceral archipelago, made up of dispersed yet interconnected island territories that are located in multiple space-times. This nissological reading – which also draws in some of Perec’s many references to other insular places (including Madagascar, Tierra del Fuego, Pulau Bidong and Jules Verne’s imaginary Lincoln Island) suggests that Perec is concerned less with individual islands (or specific insular regimes) than with the ways in which island topographies are produced as networked sites in which sovereign power and bio-politics intersect. Finally, my chapter explores the ways in which Perec’s archipelagic topographies, when understood relationally, in both spatial and temporal terms, can be seen to speak both to the complex and extended networks of power that subtend the organization of the modern world, but also the ongoing (and performative) manifestations of the past in what Derek Gregory (2004) has insightfully described as the colonial present.

Railway Cultures

In January 2018, and in collaboration with the National Railway Museum in York, the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Sheffield launched the Railway Cultures Project. The outcomes include 2 books (more on which later) and a conference, which will take place on April 19-20. The conference – Museums in Context and Partnership – will be free to attend and we’ll be publishing the final programme next week, at which point you’ll also be able to reserve a place. We do hope you’ll be able to join us for what promises to be a fantastic day!

Art + Copyright/Copyleft : A Symposium and Exhibition

Call for papers

A symposium: Art+Copyright/Copyleft

June 16th 2017 at Bank Street Arts, Sheffield

11am – 4pm

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: 

Richard Taylor, Lawyer and partner at DLA Piper LLP, specialist in Intellectual Property

Professor Robert Burrell, Head of School of Law, University of Sheffield

There will also be an exhibition of works by  Bryan Eccleshall, June 16th (including private view in the evening) – June 17th 2017.

You can listen to Richard Taylor’s recent programme on BBC Radio 4, Copyright or Wrong? (including an interview with Bryan Eccleshall) here.

occursus and Bank Street Arts are pleased to invite proposals for 20-minute contributions (including, but not limited to, papers, presentations and readings) that reflect critically on the issues and practicalities of copyright and copyleft, with particular reference to the arts (broadly interpreted).

Abstracts (300 words maximum) for 20-minute papers or presentations and a short biography (100 words maximum) should be sent to Amanda Crawley Jackson (a.j.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk) by May 15th 2017. Decisions will be announced in mid-May.

To reserve a place at the conference, please email Amanda Crawley Jackson (a.j.jackson@sheffield.ac.uk). Please note that there will be an attendance fee of £10, to include a light lunch and afternoon refreshments (tea, coffee, biscuits).  Attendance fees will be donated to Bank Street Arts.

Should you wish to purchase one of the works exhibited by Bryan Eccleshall on June 16th-17th, please note that 50% of the sale price will be donated to Bank Street Arts. Furthermore, should Bryan sell his recent work, After Pablo Picasso’s Guernica, in the course of this selling show, he will be donating 100% of the sale price to Bank Street Arts.  A catalogue of the exhibition, including prices, will be made available before and during the exhibition.

Screen Shot 2017-05-02 at 21.05.31

10bn Talks – A series of events at the University of Sheffield for L2 Achieve More

Running between February 13th – March 3rd 2017, the 10bn Talks accompany an online course open to all second-year students at the University of Sheffield. Many of these events are open to the wider University and the public.

As one of the two academic leads working on Level 2 Achieve More: 10bn, I’m looking forward to hearing colleagues including Wyn Morgan, Tony Ryan, Megan Blake, Casey Strine, Tom Webb, Alastair Buckley, Cristina Cerulli, Jackie Labbe, Marco Viceconti, Annamaria Carusi, Paul White and many others talk about issues relating to a predicted global population of 10bn.

L2 students from all disciplines, faculties and departments at the University of Sheffield can sign up for L2 Achieve More here.

A population of 10bn? A series of events at the University of Sheffield, February 13th – March 3rd 2017

According to UN data, by 2055 the global population will have reached 10bn.

Level 2 Achieve More at the University of Sheffield is organising a series of events to accompany an online course aimed at second-year undergraduate students. Some of these  events are also open to the public.

To see what’s on, follow this link.

10bn-logo

Making Common Ground at Furnace Park: place, purpose and familiarisation

lukebennett13

dscf1166

I’ve been increasingly exploring the stabilities of place. In recent years writers on place have tended to emphasise place’s flux: the way in which it is a momentary, fragile assemblage of the varied intentions, actions and desires of those who happen to be present in (or otherwise having influence over) any seemingly coherent action-space. I get this kick against formalism, but I think that it tends to present place as too fluid. My recent projects have been examining various ways by which places become stabilised (and replicated). My recent article (details here) on the role of law in shaping the form and proliferation of the ‘classic’ cotton mill published in Geoforum earlier this year is an early outing on this. And now – after three years of gestation, my article co-written with Amanda Crawley Jackson of the University of Sheffield has been published in Social and Cultural Geography

View original post 728 more words